Lydia Hearst & Crazy Eddie

So, I finally met Lydia Hearst — she was interning at BlackBook on Monday. I’m still on site at Webster Hall finishing it (something that may still take some time); the world is in turmoil when I get a “celebrity intern” messenger with a photog. I texted BlackBook and asked if I had to be nice; no one responded, so I was sort of nice.

Lydia smiled and I said, “We finally meet,” and reminded her that we did a charity event over at that bowling alley (Lucky Strike) but we were never actually introduced. “Oh yes!” she said, as if she remembered. Her publicist Alan Rish is probably smart to keep her away from people like me. I asked her what she was doing at BlackBook, why the intern thing, and she replied, “You know, the celebrity intern thing.” I asked her why not the celebrity soup kitchen thing, and she told me about her “upcoming work for hospitals around the world,” and well — I saw her differently than had been described. I asked her why I constantly saw her flipping off camera peeps, and she said she was “doing it to her best friend, not for the camera.” She seemed genuine and bright, and I’m so happy I met her.

We chatted about wallpapers and things like that, and the photog took pictures as she handed me an envelope that had a blank piece of paper in it. Then I started talking about Patty Hearst, she giggled, and Alan Rish yelled at me, and I pretended to be shocked. She asked me the name of the wallpaper designer I used at Webster Hall (Wook Kim), and I told her she could get it at Matter, that cool shop behind La Esquina. I told the heiress that it was “very expensive wallpaper,” and my assistant Nadeska shot me that look she uses to defray the advances of young men. I like Lydia Hearst; she laughed at all my little sarcasms and ignored her publicist long enough to gain my eternal favor.

On another note, my boy Mark Baker who runs Mansion called me up to tell me about his re-creation of the Crazy Eddie parties that used to bring out the best back in the day. Although I asked for details a dozen times, I only got some snippets from Mark’s assistant Emily. These circus-like events, which I recall being held at Irving Plaza (hey, if I’m wrong, I’m bound to get that call), were indeed the cat’s meow, with funhouse mirrors, crazy costumes, and I even recall a dunk-tank (although that could be wrong too). Anyway, a lot of old-school promoters turned owners and entrepreneurs are gathering tonight, Wednesday night, at Mansion. The only real facts about tonight’s event that stuck with me in all the rantings and ravings were that Lesly Bernard, Pascal, Michael James, and others who were around to remember that glorious promotion are devoting incredible energies and resources to make it so much fun tonight. Oh, and the Santa will be giving away vibrators or dildos to the women who sit on his lap. That’s pretty much how I met my second wife. And I also suggested that I DJ for a bit, as I’m old skool like that. Nobody got back to me. I guess they’re not that crazy.

UPDATE: I just heard from Pascal Sugar and here are the facts: ● Crazy Eddie lasted 70 weeks from 1990-1991 at Irving Plaza. ● Hex Hector was the resident DJ. ● They spent $3,000 per week (a lot of loot back then) creating a different theme. ● Indeed, a dunk tank (which had promoters and door-people in the wet seat) was once used. Pascal said, “People loved to pay five dollars to dunk them … the promoters were cocky, and the door-people assess, and nothing much has changed in 19 years.”

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