The Strokes Take on a Robot in New Video ‘The Adults Are Talking’

It was perhaps fitting that The Strokes released their first album in seven years on April 10, 2020, one month into the pandemic lockdowns. New York, especially, needed its heroes—and the exalted quintet had been sorely missed since going underground in 2013. That the new album was titled The New Abnormal was nothing shy of prophetic.

Now, nine months into this horror, there’s no guess even as to when we will see the band out on tour again. But they’re determined to keep bringing the goods—this time in the form of a new Roman Coppola directed video for the single ‘The Adults Are Talking,’ which they also recently performed on SNL.

The track is a jittery, anxious but pretty post-post-punk stunner, with a slightly ska undercurrent. As for the video, well, it curiously finds the boys suited up for an imaginary baseball game—except that their only opponent is a sleek, ominous Terminator-like robot. One could probably search for all sorts of metaphors here, but it’s likely that Coppola just thought it would be a fun idea. It is.

Oh, and by the way, The New Abnormal has earned The Strokes their first ever GRAMMY nomination, for Best Rock Album. Nice work, gents.

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