New Madame Gandhi ‘Waiting For Me’ Video is a Dazzling Call to Action

 

 

When we recently spoke to Madame Gandhi (now newly signed to Sony Masterworks), it turned out to be, to say the least, an inspiring conversation about self-possession, empowerment, and gender equality and justice. The Harvard graduate, TED Fellow, and one of the most original percussionists working today—the latter a job she’s done for both M.I.A. and Oprah—is nothing shy of a genuine force of nature, an activist, artist, poet and impresario all at once.

So, if it even need be said, we’re excited for anything new she sends our way—the latest of which is this utterly dazzling video for her latest single “Waiting For Me.” Directed by Misha Ghose, but conceptualized/produced by an all-female team, it was stunningly shot in India, ideologically featuring gender non-conforming cast members. The song, originally released last autumn, is vivid call to action against systems of oppression.

“I don’t want our identity to be defined according to how oppressed we are / Do you feel me?,” she fervently queries.

 

 

“We as artists have the power to use our art to vividly reimagine the world we wished we lived in,” she insists. ‘Waiting For Me’ is a song about questioning societal norms as they exist. The video opens with the quote, ‘We always assume our own powerlessness, but never our own power.’ With the interconnected social justice movements happening around the world, we are seeing a larger belief in the power of the collective for change.”

At a time when social, sexual and economic justice are all under attack, it’s nothing less than exigent that artists like Madame Gandhi take a firm stand against those who would abuse power in order to maintain it. The video seeks to do just that, but to also convey hopefulness and joy as much as anger.

“It’s a call to action for each of us to examine how hierarchy, capitalism and systemic oppression serve to keep us obedient,” she explains, “with little space for dialogue or critical thinking. My hope is that it inspires folks to ask, ‘Are my behaviors contributing to the oppression of somebody else? And what contributes to my own oppression? What does my version of freedom look and feel like?’”

 

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