Must See: ‘AfriCOBRA: Now’ at Kravets Wehby Gallery in Chelsea

‘Spirit Sister,’ Nelson Stevens

 

In 1968, The Black Power Movement was at the height of its influence. Fighting for equality with a militant belief in self-sufficiency and acceptance, the movement encouraged radical thought and action for the Black community across the world. That same year, five members of the group came together to start their own movement: AfriCOBRA, or the African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists, with the goal of using art to, well, change the world.

A new exhibition, AfriCOBRA: Now, at Kravets Wehby Gallery in Manhattan, brings together art from the group to showcase the work from these subversive artists who, until now, have been relatively unsung. Featuring pieces by its founding members and many others, including Kevin Cole, Adger Owens, Wadsworth Jarrell and Renee Stout, the exhibit shines a light on art from an era — and a group – in which nothing was more powerful than self-love. Through painting and sculpture, these AfriCOBRA artists celebrated African culture and examined their experiences as Black artists in an ever-changing culture. With AfriCOBRA:Now, their voices are finally being heard.

Preview some of our favorite pieces from the exhibit, below.

 

‘AfriCOBRA: Now’ is on view at Kravets Wehby Gallery, 521 West 21st Street, now until August 16.

 

Photos courtesy of Kravets Wehby Gallery, New York.

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