Listen: New Syd Silvair Single ‘The Moth’ is Equal Parts Beautiful and Sinister

 

 

There’s an old expression: “Don’t be the moth, be the flame.” But it takes on a bit of a sinister undertone on the new Syd Silvair single “The Moth,” released today via Things We Like Records.

Indeed, despite the song’s dreamy atmospherics, and Sylvair’s alluringly breathy vocal performance, the lyrics tell of a pernicious, and ultimately malevolent co-dependence. As she matter-of-factly recites, “The shock, the shock, the shock / When he looked down and he realized / That I was much more dangerous than him,” the Saint-Etienne-as-possibly-produced-by-David-Lynch sonics only serve to make it all the more eerie. In fact, we couldn’t help but be reminded of Romeo Void’s haunted classic “A Girl in Trouble.”

 

 

A tarot reader by day, Silvair actually explains “The Moth” in terms of its relation to The Magician Card—though one hardly need be an astrology aficionado to relate.

“It reminds us that the very traits which have rendered us helpless can be alchemized into our fiercest weapons. By emboldening our inner reality, the outside world will follow.”

Advice best heeded in earnest.

 

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