BlackBook Premiere: New Crown Lands Single + Video Draws Attention to Violence Against Indigenous Womxn

 

 

It’s a tragedy years in the making, and it doesn’t seem to be stopping anytime soon. For over four decades, women have been continuous victims of serial violence along a specific stretch of highway in northwest Canada dubbed the Highway of Tears. There are killers on the loose and everyone knows it.

Yellowhead Highway 16 runs horizontally for 450 miles across British Columbia, it’s breathtaking country; it is also home to over 20 Native American settlements where life is very difficult, and young people frequently resort to hitchhiking, since cars, and even cell phones, are often cost prohibitive. Perhaps like priests with choir boys, vulnerable girls are an easy target.

There are numerous initiatives in place to bring greater awareness to these this terrible reality; but until now, no voice from the rock & roll community that we know of. Enter Crown Lands, the glammy prog duo from Oshawa, Ontario, who rock out with impressive abandon, recalling everyone from Led Zep to Rush to Wolfmother, with whom they could readily share a stage. And in anticipation of their debut album release in August, the stylish twosome are dropping “End of the Road,” a driving rocker of a track that calls attention to these tragedies, and whose video employs native style dance and native dancers.

 

 

“‘End of the Road’ is an outcry for awareness and action surrounding the colonial horrors of the missing and murdered womxn, girls, and Two-Spirits that still haunt Indigenous communities today,” explains the band’s Cody Bowles. “Violence against Indigenous people is something I have witnessed firsthand throughout my life. It’s up to all of us to make this world a better place for future generations, and this song is a small message of hope adding to the rising wave of Indigenous resistance throughout this land.”

He himself grew up Mi’kmaw, and lived out his childhood in and around Alderville First Nation. Identifying as Two-Spirit, his dream is simply of a better world for Indigenous womxn, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ people.

Bandmate Kevin Comeau adds, “It’s a message of solidarity for people that Canada has turned its back on. The Highway of Tears is a symptom of a much larger issue in our country, Indigenous womxn are disproportionately affected by violence in Canada. We want use our voice to bring awareness and help make a difference.”

 

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