The 10 Biggest Snubs of This Year’s Oscar Noms

 

The Oscar noms have proven to be a jolly old time for many films this year: Get Out, Lady Bird, and The Shape of Water have all done swimmingly, as has Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. But there were several actors and filmmakers left out of this year’s picks. From seasoned vets robbed of expected praise to newcomers with their Academy debuts snatched away from them, we take a look at this year’s ten biggest snubs:

 

Luca Guadagnino, Call Me By Your Name

While the film adaptation of Andre Aciman’s gay romance novel certainly received plenty of love, including for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, and and Best Actor, openly gay Guadagnino was sadly left out – particularly shocking as the film’s direction is one of its greatest strengths.

Tiffany Haddish, Girls Trip

While it’s not exactly surprising that the Academy has shunned comedies once again, Haddish was an exception: she had won the New York Film Critics’ Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress, and thanks to her over-the-top-hysterical role in the film, there was hope she just might carry that buzz all the way to the Oscars. Sadly, it was not to be.

Tilda Swinton, Okja

The truth is, Okja could have comprised all ten snubs in this list – it’s without question one of the year’s best films, unfortunately overlooked all season. Perhaps it’s because it came out straight to Netflix, or perhaps it’s because people don’t take movies about CGI pigs seriously. Either way, see Okja – Swinton’s is just one of the many exceptional performances in it.

Armie Hammer, Call Me By Your Name

While Timothée Chalamet is the decided star of Guadagnino’s film, Hammer gave a pretty stellar performance as well. His take on Oliver was subtle, human, and charming, and at the beginning of awards season, he seemed to be poised for Academy greatness. Now, however, it’s confirmed that we will have to put all of our prayers into Chalamet’s Elio.

Tom Hanks, The Post

Streep scored an Oscar nom for The Post but, sadly, five-time Oscar nominee Hanks won’t be considered for a sixth He’s won twice, most recently for Forrest Gump in 1994.

Dee Rees, Mudbound

Mudbound is another critically-acclaimed film left out to dry come awards season, further contributing to our theory that the Academy is biased against movies released through streaming services. It’s not a total shutout for Rees, however – although she wasn’t nominated for Direction, she scored for Best Adapted Screenplay, and her cinematographer Rachel Morrison also received a nomination, as well as Best Supporting Actress Mary J. Blige.

Steven Spielberg, The Post

Spielberg wasn’t nominated for Best Director – though, honestly, boo hoo. He’s won 3 and been nominated another 11 times, so it’s safe to say this shutout won’t kill him. Still, his direction of The Post has received much acclaim, and it’s a bit shocking to see the Hollywood titan ignored.

Holly Hunter, The Big Sick

After The Big Sick debuted at last year’s Sundance, where it won Best Original Screenplay, Holly Hunter seemed a shoe-in for Best Supporting Actress. As the year progressed, however, the category seems to have just become too crowded, and Hunter sadly hasn’t made the cut.

Seo-Hyun Ahn, Okja

We have to give some more love to Okja. We’ve already stated our case about how it’s the most under-appreciated film of the year, and we’ve already given the obvious love to Our President, Ms. Swinton. But the truth is Okja’s narrative and emotional care is carried by and large solely by 14-year-old Korean actress Seo-Hyun Ahn, who delivers a performance that is just as much psychologically complex as it is physically grueling.

Michael Stuhlbarg, Call Me By Your Name

We’d be remiss if we didn’t mention Stuhlbarg’s performance as Elio’s warm-hearted father – while he doesn’t get much screen time, he does have a pivotal scene at the end of the film that rescues the gay community as a whole from certain destruction.

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