Afternoon Coffee Break: Today’s Required Reading

Whenever the 3 o’clock hour rolls around and you’re slumping down at your desk tiptoeing towards an existential crisis, it’s often best reward yourself with a brief respite and a strong cup of coffee. But while you’re taking a moment to lift your head from the mass of work it’s been buried under, spend a moment catching up on some particularly interesting writing and news floating around the internet that you’ve been too busy to peruse through. Take a look at what we’ve been engrossed with this morning. 

  • Ranked: Rainer Werner Fassbinder Films From Worst To Best: "The five films included in Criterion’s essential new Eclipse set feel like spending a week with a repertory theater company. It would be unfair to judge Fassbinder’s entire filmography as a body of work, but equally wrong to examine a particular film without taking all of the rest of them into account." [ Film.com ] + while you’re there, check out our essay on one of his best melodramas, The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant.
     
  • 9 Images From ‘Playboy’s’ Golden Age: "Hugh Hefner’s Playboy, which Taschen has recently repackaged into a more affordable six-volume set, provides a visual glimpse into the Golden Age of Playboy, when the magazine was at the vanguard of high and lowbrow culture, the changing times, and it challenged the establishment in ways that might seem silly today, but were considered quite subversive in the twenty years following the Second World War." [ Flavorwire ]
     
  • Get excited. "Nine Inch Nails are streaming their new album Hesitation Marks on iTunes a week before the scheduled release." [ Rolling Stone ]
     
  • Open Letter: Kate Bornstein to Chelsea Manning: "According to the Leavenworth prisoners’ handbook, Manning will not have Internet access, so we will physically mail this to her (there’s a whole procedure to follow if we want it to get to her, and we have to use her "Bradley" name and prison number, once it’s assigned), so if anyone wants to also send the physical letter, please do." [ Out ]
     
  • Keynote: Shadow Of A Doubt: "Released in 1943, Shadow Of A Doubt was Hitchcock’s sixth film after his move from England to the United States. With some occasional backtracking, Hitchcock called it his favorite of his films, and the one “our friends, the plausibles and logicians, cannot complain about.” [ The Dissolve ]
     
  • Liz Cohen’s Conceptual Car Takes Top Prize at Real-Life Lowrider Fest: "Artist Liz Cohen spent more than eight years crafting her “Trabantimino,” a hybrid vehicle that is part East German compact workhorse Trabant, part Chevy El Camino, and that transforms via hydraulics. An exploration of DIY culture and the playful mixing of identities, the project has been shown — to well-deserved acclaim — at Lower East Side gallery Salon 94 and at the inaugural edition of Frieze New York (2012)." [ Art Info ]
     
  • Tchaikovsky’s sexuality ‘downplayed’ in biopic under Russia’s anti-gay law: "The film’s screenwriter, Yuri Arabov, denied Tchaikovsky had been gay and said his script had been revised to portray the composer as "a person without a family who has been stuck with the opinion that he supposedly loves men" and who suffers over these "rumours", he told the newspaper Izvestiya." [ Guardian ]
     
  • Coen, Denis, Desplechin, Jonze Set for NYFF: Opening Act: "New York Film Festival season is starting a little early this year with the announcement of Film Society’s new series NYFF: Opening Act, which will run the week leading up to the 51st edition of the festival." [ FilmLinc ]
     
  • The Bruce High Quality Foundation University Returns this Fall: "The Bruce High Quality Foundation University—a one-room schoolhouse located just above a bodega—returns this September. The BHQFU is like grad school, but it’s mostly free, with classes offered on nights and weekends." [ Art F City ]
     
  • Musk’s New Hologram Project Invites ‘Iron Man’ Comparisons: "Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk—who is often compared to Stark by the tech press—is apparently creating the real-life equivalent of that fictional hologram system. “We figured out how to design rocket parts just w hand movements through the air (seriously),” he Tweeted August 23. “Now need a high frame rate holograph generator.” [ Slashdot ]
     
  • Nowhere to Go But Everywhere: "Paul Rogers has made “an illustrated scroll” in which he illustrates a line from every page of On the Road." [ The Paris Review ]

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